Review Policy

Monday, November 29, 2010

Book Review: What About Me? 12 Ways to Get Your Parents' Attention (Without Hitting Your Sister)

Author: Eileen Kennedy-Moore
illustrated by Mits Katayama
Interest Level: Ages 4-6

From the Book Jacket: Parents get busy and children get lonely. Children will do almost anything to satisfy their need to interact with Mom or Dad. If peaceful means don't work, they will try more drastic measures, such as screaming, hitting, or snatching toys. What About Me? offers twelve ways for children to get attention from parents or other grown-ups that are pleasant, positive, and possible for a small child to do.

Have fun reading this charming book to your child and then leave it out for him or her to revisit at any time. Don't be surprised when you see your child begin to use some of the twelve ways to get your attention. When you notice and react positively, your child will be encouraged to use the strategies again and again. Enjoy the result: a more peaceful home!

Why It's On My Bookshelf: Loving this book. I mean LOVING this book. It's simple, to the point, and totally encourages POSITIVE behavior. If you are a parent and just about had it with all the negative attention getting - you are going to want this in your library. I found it at my local bookstore with a SALE sticker on it and was glad I got to it first.

First page shows a busy family in the kitchen and brother is sort of scratching his head with an, 'Hmmm...no one is paying attention to me' look on his face. Turn the page and now brother looks like he's about to be up to no good! "You could hit your little sister...But you know you'd get in trouble. So there must be something else that you could try. You could..." The story continues listing twelve different positive things a child could do to get a positive reaction from a parent.

Take it a step further. Don't just read the story and expect behavior magic. Might be cool to make a list of positive attention getters with your own kiddos. Take the time to explain to them that you are clued into their behavior whether it's negative or positive. It will help their awareness.

Author Eileen Kennedy-Moore writes a SMART letter to parents on the last page. As a psychologist and mother of four kids - her tips and advice are right on.

A Link to This Book:

4 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for this lovely review, and for understanding the "heart" of this book!

    A lot of times parents hear, "Just ignore him--he's only doing it for attention!" I think this is bad advice, because attention is a real need, for kids and for all of us. The trick is knowing how to ask for positive attention. What About Me has "12 Ways" because we wanted to give children choices rather than rules for coping with feelings of jealousy or being left out.

    One school counselor told me that she and some of her students made their own version of What About Me: 12 Ways to Get Your Teacher's Attention Without Bothering Your Classmates!

    In case you're interested, I have a new co-authored book for parents coming out in March:

    Smart Parenting for Smart Kids: Nurturing Your Child's True Potential (Jossey-Bass/Wiley).

    It offers practical parenting tips for helping children develop the social and emotional skills they need to make the most of their abilities and create satisfying lives.

    It's available for pre-order on Amazon:
    http://www.amazon.com/Smart-Parenting-Kids-Nurturing-Potential/dp/0470640057/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1291302201&sr=8-1

    Thanks again for your review and for the wonderful service you offer in guiding parents and teachers towards meaningful books!

    Sincerely,

    Eileen

    Eileen Kennedy-Moore, PhD
    http://www.eileenkennedymoore.com

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  2. Forgot to mention: There's a video trailer about What About Me here:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGwRZfKJkco

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  3. As the publicist for Eileen's publisher, I share her delight in your review. You and your students might be interested to know that the illustrations were done by a Japanese-American grandfather, in his late 70s at the time and now 80. He started drawing as a small child when attending a three-room schoolhouse in an agricultural community south of Seattle. You'll find his story as well as Eileen's at www.parentingpress.com/media/wam.html.

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  4. Sounds like a great book. Thanks for the review!

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